The Letterbook of Eliza Lucas Pinckney, 1739-1762
Language: en
Pages: 195
Authors: Lucas Pinckney, Eliza Lucas Pinckney
Categories: Plantation life
Type: BOOK - Published: 1972 - Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press

Books about The Letterbook of Eliza Lucas Pinckney, 1739-1762
The Letterbook of Eliza Lucas Pinckhey, 1739- 1762. Ed. by Elise Pinckhey
Language: en
Pages: 195
Authors: Eliza Lucas Pinckney
Categories: Plantation life
Type: BOOK - Published: 1972 - Publisher:

Books about The Letterbook of Eliza Lucas Pinckhey, 1739- 1762. Ed. by Elise Pinckhey
Eliza Lucas Pinckney
Language: en
Pages: 344
Authors: Lorri Glover
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-08-25 - Publisher: Yale University Press

The enthralling story of Eliza Lucas Pinckney, an innovative, highly regarded, and successful woman plantation owner during the Revolutionary era Eliza Lucas Pinckney (1722-1793) reshaped the colonial South Carolina economy with her innovations in indigo production and became one of the wealthiest and most respected women in a world dominated
Eliza Lucas Pinckney
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: Margaret F. Pickett
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-07-19 - Publisher: McFarland

In 1739, Major George Lucas moved from Antigua to Charleston, South Carolina, with his wife and two daughters. Soon after their arrival, England declared war on Spain and he was recalled to Antigua to join his regiment. His wife in poor health, he left his daughter Eliza, 17, in charge
London Booksellers and American Customers
Language: en
Pages: 522
Authors: James Raven, University Lecturer in Modern History University of Oxford and Fellow James Raven
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2002 - Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

In 1994, James Raven encountered a letterbook from the Charleston Library Society detailing the ordering, processing, and shipping of texts from London booksellers to their American customers. The 120 letters, covering the period 1758-1811, provided unique material for understanding the business of London booksellers (for whom very little correspondence has