Contextualizing the Sacred in the Hellenistic and Roman Near East

Contextualizing the Sacred in the Hellenistic and Roman Near East

Author: Rubina Raja

Publisher: Contextualizing the Sacred

ISBN: 2503569633

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 995

The study of religion and religious identities in the Hellenistic and Roman Near East has been a focus within archaeology and ancient history for centuries. Yet the transition between the Hellenistic and Roman period remains difficult to grasp from the archaeological and epigraphic evidence. This volume brings together contributions by leading scholars working on religious identity and religion in the Hellenistic and Roman periods in the Roman Near East. For this volume they have been asked to address a variety of questions concerning religion, religious development, and religious identities from the Hellenistic period to Late Antiquity. These research questions have resulted in a suite of contributions which draw upon a wide range of empirical evidence, from epigraphical material to literary and archaeological sources. In the ancient Near East we cannot speak of a common religion, nor of a common literary tradition, but when seen through the lens of contextualization, the material and textual evidence brings forward new narratives about the great variations in worship, myths, and identities, as well as the different religious systems of the region and of the people inhabiting it. The contributions offer concretized ideas about and research on various aspects of religion within a framework of very different settings, of local, regional, or imperial character. This volume is a must for any scholar or student of the Hellenistic, Roman, and Late Roman Near East, and the contributions provide new insights into the ways in which we may approach this region, offering complex but plentiful material to be studied.
Contextualizing the Sacred in the Hellenistic and Roman Near East
Language: de
Pages: 260
Authors: Rubina Raja
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-08-31 - Publisher: Contextualizing the Sacred

The study of religion and religious identities in the Hellenistic and Roman Near East has been a focus within archaeology and ancient history for centuries. Yet the transition between the Hellenistic and Roman period remains difficult to grasp from the archaeological and epigraphic evidence. This volume brings together contributions by
A Companion to the Hellenistic and Roman Near East
Language: en
Pages: 580
Authors: Ted Kaizer
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2022-01-06 - Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

Discover a comprehensive and cross-disciplinary handbook exploring several sub-regions and key themes perfect for a new generation of students A Companion to the Hellenistic and Roman Near East delivers the first complete handbook in the area of Hellenistic and Roman Near Eastern history. The book is divided into sections dealing
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Language: en
Pages: 323
Authors: Jörg Rüpke, Greg Woolf
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-10-06 - Publisher: Kohlhammer Verlag

The Roman Empire was home to a fascinating variety of different cults and religions. Its enormous extent, the absence of a precisely definable state religion and constant exchanges with the religions and cults of conquered peoples and of neighbouring cultures resulted in a multifaceted diversity of religious convictions and practices.
Time and Its Adversaries in the Seleucid Empire
Language: en
Pages: 390
Authors: Paul J. Kosmin
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-12-03 - Publisher: Harvard University Press

Under Seleucid rule, time no longer restarted with each new monarch. Instead, progressively numbered years, identical to the system we use today, became the measure of historical duration. Paul Kosmin shows how this invention of a new kind of time—and resistance to it—transformed the way we organize our thoughts about
Pearl of the Desert
Language: en
Pages: 249
Authors: Rubina Raja
Categories: Tadmur (Syria)
Type: BOOK - Published: 2022 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

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