Chess Players' Thinking

Chess Players' Thinking

Author: Pertti Saariluoma

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415120799

Category: Games & Activities

Page: 201

View: 925

A comprehensive analysis of chess players' cognition which introduces and reanalyses a number of classic psychological concepts such as apperception and restructuring.
Chess Thinking
Language: en
Pages: 316
Authors: Bruce Pandolfini
Categories: Crafts & Hobbies
Type: BOOK - Published: 1995-04-18 - Publisher: Simon and Schuster

A first-of-its-kind encyclopedia for chess players, this volume features detailed explanations and invaluable illustrations for new chess players, those intent on improving their games, and anyone who needs to brush up on both the basics and more advanced play. 140 detailed illustrations.
Thought and Choice in Chess
Language: en
Pages: 484
Authors: Adriaan D. de Groot
Categories: Chess
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008 - Publisher: Amsterdam University Press

Annotation. What does a chessmaster think when he prepartes his next move? How are his thoughts organized? Which methods and strategies does he use by solving his problem of choice? To answer these questions, the author did an experimental study in 1938, to which famous chessmasters participated (Alekhine, Max Euwe
Chess Players' Thinking
Language: en
Pages: 201
Authors: Pertti Saariluoma
Categories: Games & Activities
Type: BOOK - Published: 1995 - Publisher: Psychology Press

A comprehensive analysis of chess players' cognition which introduces and reanalyses a number of classic psychological concepts such as apperception and restructuring.
Thought and Choice in Chess
Language: en
Pages: 479
Authors: Adriaan D. de Groot
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-07-24 - Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

Books about Thought and Choice in Chess
Better Thinking, Better Chess
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: Joel Benjamin
Categories: Games & Activities
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-10-09 - Publisher: New In Chess

Finding strong moves doesn't simply depend on how much you know about chess. In fact, greater conceptual knowledge makes choosing a move more complex as it increases the number of directions your mind can take. More important is optimizing your thought process. Grandmaster Joel Benjamin knows that pointing out the